Pamela Jane's Studio » Hand over Heart Designs

Shortly after Eileen Hull and I met in 2012 and realized we were almost neighbors, we quickly concocted the lovely idea of teaching several classes together with her fabulous 3-D dies that she designs for Sizzix.  Our first class showcased her Sizzix Pro house die, perfect for making a holiday house or village.  With my first class sample, I had such fun painting and lettering the house that I was totally hooked on using Eileen’s magical dies to build things I could use as an alternative canvas.

Today, I’m excited to be a member of Eileen’s new Design Team for Sizzix, happily “tasked” with finding more ways to incorporate my style with her new dies.  To introduce ourselves, we designers are sharing some of our previous projects and style approaches.  For me, it’s appropriate to start with another class project taught with Eileen using her heart box die.  My class samples included a painted candy box (above) and another deeper box that I built up from the same die and covered like a suitcase with a hinged top (below).  It’s pretty amazing to me how much you can manipulate her dies, changing materials and adjusting for many uses.  Oh, and the paper flowers on both boxes were made from another Eileen Hull die called flower layers w/heart petals.

Since I love to doodle and letter (including in my art journals), I’ll be looking for more ways to do so on my Design Team projects for Eileen.  Below are samples from my doodling class “Doodle Ink” taught at Handmade U in Omaha (next semester is coming up), another sample from my lettering class “Doodle Amour” taught at French General in LA, followed by some doodled song lyrics.

More of my doodling efforts are included in Jenny Doh’s Craft-a-Doodle book and in Amy Powers’ many crafty Inspired Ideas ezines.  
Right now, but hopefully for not much longer, all of my painting and journaling and die-cutting supplies are stacked in teetering piles in my dining room while my new studio is being built.  It will be a dream made real for me to finally have a place to paint and create without stealing time and space, often running out of both.  And what fun to be on Eileen’s Design Team to start things rolling, just in time for this long-awaited spring!
Journal page in progress
You, too, can share your favorite projects and join the monthly “Art with Heart” kickoff challenge hosted by Sizzix Designer Eileen Hull and Design Team coordinator Amy Bowerman.  Just link your blog post to Eileen’s site for a chance to win!
  • Donna - Wow now that is some awesome doodles! Your work is beautiful!
    I am so excited to be on this new creative adventure with you!
    Your new team mate DonnaReplyCancel

  • Eileen Hull - What a delicious post Pam! I am always in awe of your artistry! Thanks so much for being part if the team…ReplyCancel

  • Amy* - Pam you are a Doodle Diva! I love your illustrative style and I am so excited to see how you continue to combine that with Eileen’s dies. I have so enjoyed building my dream studio vicariously through you!

    So happy to have you and your inspiring art on the team!

    Amy*ReplyCancel

  • Rosetta Savage-Jenkins - Congrats on being part of Eileen’s team of gifted artisans. I am looking forward to getting to know your work! That heart is fabulous!ReplyCancel

  • Beth - Glad to be on the team with you, Pam – love your style!ReplyCancel

Yesterday a few friends came over to walk around inside my studio in its current construction phase and to feel the possibilities of the space.  It felt great!

The windows still have their plastic protective coating on all the panes.  But sunlight still streamed in the front Palladian windows, and we opened the doors for a fine breeze and a long view of the forest out the back window wall, all welcome and hopeful signs of how the space will nurture me and my guests.  Sadly, today it is empty again, since none of the expected deliveries arrived and no one came to work.  It’s another day of dreaming of what’s to come.

If you are interested in being on my mailing list for classes hosted in my studio, 
taught by wonderful guest artists and me, too,
please send me your email address at pj (dot) keravuori (at) mac (dot) com, 
and please stay tuned. ๐Ÿ™‚

Just checking in to say there is progress, however slow, on construction of 
my new studio.
Besides battling the intemperate winter weather here,
we’ve been bearing the brunt of delivery delays all along the line.
Construction has already taken twice as long as predicted,
and we still have a ways to go.
My son is building his latest huge tall commercial building in Boston,
and it seems my small enterprise will take almost as long (only half joking).
But I’m finally able to get a sense of the space and atmosphere
that will soon be a reality.
Now that the scaffolding is removed from all but a short side section,
here’s the front wall in the late afternoon wintry sun
after the rainstorm passed through.

  • Lisa - How exciting! You must be chomping at the bit to get in there and start creating in your new space. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Thanks for sharing the progress!ReplyCancel

  • Mary Truax - The studio is going to be wonderful! I have family in MD, so perhaps will join you when you open it up to students. I’ve been thinking about sharing my passion of quilting with some of the neighbor kids. Reading about your journey gives me hope to hold on tight to my dreams.ReplyCancel

By late this afternoon, most of the studio windows have been delivered, 
just in time for the next snow storm that starts in this area tonight.
Progress, however slow.
In the morning came the skylights in the right number but in the wrong size.  
Because of the continuing cold weather,
the crew was here for the first time this week to install the skylights, 
but since they had to be returned, 
the crew braved the cold to work on the back stairs instead.

After noon came the tall center Palladian window and two sets of French doors 
by pick-up truck.  
Apparently, they were too tall or wide for the main delivery truck.

Finally, late in the afternoon, the main delivery truck lumbered down our driveway 
with the rest of the fun window shapes.  
Unfortunately, two of those Palladian windows are fixed instead of opening, 
so they will also be exchanged.
But in the remaining hours of daylight, 
our crew began installing the center window.
Below you can see the sequence.  
The window snapped into place sort of like a Lego window, 
except that it was very heavy and entailed a lot of hammering to secure.  
One down.

With the heavy snow expected here tonight, 
it may be next week before they can get back to work.  
That’s the way it’s been going.

When construction of my new studio finally passed all the county hurdles
just before Thanksgiving
(after more than six months of submitting drawings, electrical plans,
and manufacturers’ signature guarantees to meet the newest codes), 
our long driveway soon filled up with piles of lumber, scaffolding, 
work trucks, workmen, tools, stacks of bricks,
and a huge dumpster.
The first step was deconstruction, taking down the roof and attic area 
over our garage and family room.

Then it was a juggling act to enclose the new space
while snow and sleet and icy weather (and the holidays)
allowed only one or two days of work per week over the past two months.
The giant blue tarps covered the emerging structure between work days.

It’s been grindingly slow progress, but now with four walls, a roof,
and most of the electrical wiring in place, I can share a few photos with you.

The south-facing front wall went up first, 
with its openings for three large Palladian-style windows.
For weeks, the only entry into the space was by climbing up a ladder
and clambering through the center front window.
The workmen and I followed the same route. ๐Ÿ™‚

Above is a view of the front windows from the inside as the walls and roof came together.

Along one long exterior wall are openings for another Palladian window, 
the French-door entry, and clerestory windows on either side of the chimney.

Across my back work area is a glorious full wall of segmented windows 
facing north, with a center set of French doors
that open onto a narrow balcony overlooking the forest.
The cathedral ceiling will remain raised, exposing the beams.
Unfortunately, no forest view yet, since everything is still covered 
in Tyvek to keep out the visiting arctic snow and rain.
But the workmen are liking the interior view and proudly sharing
their photos as the space takes on its own atmosphere.
Our puppy, Bogie, likes all the attention from the workmen
but doesn’t like the scaffolding they built.

The old brick work was removed and new brick is partly in place.
But the below-freezing temperatures of the last two weeks
have temporarily put construction on hold.
Every stage of this project has been a challenge,
with decisions being delayed, altered or upgraded on a regular basis.
Luckily, northern VA is having a relative ‘heat wave’ this weekend,
and maybe the windows will arrive this week.
But all the frustrating delays will be worth it when,
after some 27 household moves in and out of the country,
I’ll have a place of my own design where I can paint
and continue dreaming. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Anonymous - Pam, it looks like it will be beautiful! Love the windows. After 27 moves you deserve a very special space for you and your art. Very excited for you. Take care my friend!ReplyCancel

  • Charlene - Oh Pam it’s stunning! I know you must be beside yourself & over the moon! I am so happy for YOU! Hugs!ReplyCancel

  • Sandy - I expect you will not leave your studio for months when it is completed!! It’s fun imagining how spectacular it is going to look!ReplyCancel

  • Leanne - Those window spaces are out of this world! This is going to be a glorious space to work in! Can’t wait to see it finished!ReplyCancel

  • Pamela Jane - Thank you so much, ladies! As you can see, it’s all about the windows. Once it’s done, you’ll know where to find me, painting away.ReplyCancel

  • Eileen Hull - Looking good Pam! Can’t wait to see it in person ๐Ÿ™‚ Such an inspiring place to work…ReplyCancel